Sunday, November 27, 2022

What Are Side Effects From Pneumonia Shot

How Should I Use This Medicine

There’s a new pneumonia vaccine for adults

This vaccine is for injection into a muscle. It is given by a health care professional.

A copy of Vaccine Information Statements will be given before each vaccination. Read this sheet carefully each time. The sheet may change frequently.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 6 weeks old for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

The Effects Of Pneumonia On The Body

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs. Bacteria and viruses are the most common causes of pneumonia. Fungi can induce pneumonia, too. The infection causes inflammation in the air sacs of the lungs. This results in a buildup of fluid that makes it hard to breathe. Pneumonia can be a medical emergency, especially among high-risk groups like people over 65 and children 5 or younger.

Pneumonia typically affects the lungs, but complications can lead to problems in other areas of the body, too. These can be very serious and even deadly. Your risk, treatment, and recovery time depend on what caused the infection, your age, and any additional health issues you had before getting pneumonia.

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Pcv And Ppsv Vaccines

Kids may have redness, tenderness, or swelling where the shot was given. A child also might have a fever after getting the shot. There is a very small chance of an allergic reaction with any vaccine.

The pneumococcal vaccines contain only a small piece of the germ and so cannot cause pneumococcal disease.

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When To Get The Vaccine

Thereâs no such thing as pneumonia season, like flu season. If you and your doctor decide that you need to have a pneumonia vaccine, you can get it done at any time of the year. If itâs flu season, you can even get a pneumonia vaccine at the same time that you get a flu vaccine, as long as you receive each shot in a different arm.

Allergic Reactions To The Pneumococcal Vaccine

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Very occasionally, a child or adult may have a serious allergic reaction after either type of pneumococcal vaccination.

Known as an anaphylactic reaction, this can cause life-threatening breathing difficulties.

Anaphylaxis is a rare, serious side effect that can happen within minutes of the injection. It’s very alarming at the time, but it can be treated with adrenaline.

The doctor or nurse giving the vaccine will have been trained to know how to treat anaphylactic reactions.

Provided they receive treatment promptly, children and adults make a complete recovery.

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Side Effects Requiring Immediate Medical Attention

Along with its needed effects, pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor or nurse immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine:

More common

  • skin itching, rash, or redness
  • sneezing
  • swelling of the face, throat, or tongue
  • tightness in the chest
  • blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
  • bloody or cloudy urine
  • difficult, burning, or painful urination
  • dilated neck veins
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • lightheadedness
  • lower back or side pain
  • muscle aches and pains
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • rapid, shallow breathing
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
  • sweating
  • swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs
  • swollen, painful, or tender lymph glands in the neck, armpit, or groin
  • trouble sleeping
  • weight gain

Does Pneumovax 23 Cause Side Effects

Pneumovax 23 is an immunization used to prevent pneumonia. This pneumococcal vaccine contains chemicals extracted from 23 types of Streptococcuspneumonia bacteria.

Upon injecting pneumococcal vaccine, the body recognizes these chemical as foreign and produces antibodies to destroy the chemicals. Antibodies are blood protein that help the body fight infection and destroy other harmful substances.

Once produced, these antibodies destroy injected Streptococcuspneumonia chemicals but the antibodies remain active in the body and can detect the same chemicals from live Streptococcus pneumonia in the future. If a vaccinated person comes in contact with Streptococcus pneumonia the antibodies will destroy the bacteria and prevent pneumonia or reduce its severity.

Pneumovax 23 should not be confused with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine used in special conditions because often in the medical literature the non-specific term “pneumococcal vaccine” is used.

Common side effects of Pneumovax 23 include

Serious side effects of Pneumovax 23 include severe allergic reactions.

Drug interactions of Pneumovax 23 include zoster vaccine live administered at the same time. When they are given concurrently, Pneumovax 23 reduces the response of zoster vaccine compared to those who received both vaccines 4 weeks apart.

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Who Should Not Get The Vaccine

People should not get the vaccine if they have had a life threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose.

Additionally, a person should not undergo vaccination if they have had an allergic reaction to medication containing diphtheria toxoid or an earlier form of the pneumonia vaccination .

Lastly, people who are sick or have allergic reactions to any of the ingredients of the vaccine should talk to a doctor before getting the shot.

A pneumonia shot will not reduce pneumonia. However, it helps prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases, such as meningitis, endocarditis, empyema, and bacteremia, which is when bacteria enter the bloodstream.

Noninvasive pneumococcal disease includes sinusitis.

There are two types of pneumonia shots available. Which type a person gets depends on their age, whether or not they smoke, and the presence of any underlying medical conditions.

The two types are:

  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : Healthcare providers recommend this vaccine for young children, people with certain underlying conditions, and some people over the age of 65 years.
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine : Healthcare providers recommend this vaccine for anyone over 65 years of age, people with certain underlying conditions, and people who smoke.

According to the

  • roughly 8 in 10 babies from invasive pneumococcal disease
  • 45 in 100 adults 65 years or older against pneumococcal pneumonia
  • 75 in 100 adults 65 years or older against invasive pneumococcal disease

What Are The Side Effects Of The Pneumonia Vaccine

Your Best Shot Pneumococcal Vaccines

Most people don’t usually have serious side effects from either vaccine, but it’s possible to have some mild symptoms.

The most common side effects with PCV13 include:

  • Redness where the shot was given.
  • Swelling where the shot was given.
  • Pain or tenderness where the shot was given.
  • Fever.

The most common side effects with PPSV23 include:

  • Redness where the shot was given.
  • Pain where the shot was given.
  • Fever.
  • Muscle aches.

If you do happen to have side effects, CDC says they’ll usually go away within two days.

Also Check: How Can You Know If You Have Pneumonia

Everything You Need To Know About The Pneumonia Vaccine

During the winter months, many people think that they have a nasty cold or flu, but it turns out to be pneumonia an illness that can be life threatening in certain people. A vaccine can help lower your chance of contracting pneumonia. While the pneumonia vaccine does not prevent all cases of pneumonia, it reduces the severity of the disease.

That is especially important for older adults and if you have certain medical conditions that put you at greater risk for complications.

Now is the time to talk to your doctor about your risks and if you need a vaccine to protect you against pneumonia.

Niharika Juwarkar, MD, Internal Medicine with Firelands Physician Group, answers your most frequently asked questions about pneumonia and the risks.

What is pneumonia?

Pneumonia is a respiratory lung infection that is often mistaken for the flu. Your lungs become filled with fluid or pus that results in inflammation. Symptoms are very similar to the flu, but pneumonia can last for weeks and result in very serious complications.

While pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi, most cases are due to a specific bacteria called streptococcus pneumoniae, more commonly known as pneumococcal pneumonia. This form can be treated with antibiotics. Your doctor can test to see what form of pneumonia you have. Treatment depends on the type of pneumonia you have and the severity of your symptoms. But, the best defense is vaccination.

Who is most at risk for pneumonia?

Who Should Get Pneumococcal Vaccines

CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger than 2 years old and all adults 65 years or older. In certain situations, older children and other adults should also get pneumococcal vaccines. Below is more information about who should and should not get each type of pneumococcal vaccine.

Talk to your or your childs doctor about what is best for your specific situation.

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About The Pneumonia Vaccine

Pneumonia is a common enough illness, but its one that can have potentially devastating reactions. Fortunately, theres a way to prevent the serious side effects of the disease, and possibly prevent someone from getting it to begin with.

The pneumonia vaccine is a safe way to prevent most cases, and effectively lowers the chances of catching the disease entirely. People who do get pneumonia after getting the pneumonia vaccination anyway will have a much milder case of the disease if they do happen to contract it.

Have You Experienced A Pneumonia Vaccine Reaction

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Proper technique is critical for intramuscular vaccines such as the pneumococcal vaccine. Specifically, the Center for Disease Control advises that the needle should be inserted at a 90-degree angle to the skin, as close to the deltoid muscle as possible. While this may seem fool-proof, mistakes are common and can lead to tendonitis and other musculoskeletal injuries in the shoulder and arm. Improper vaccine administration can allow for the needle to cause damage to the nerves, muscles and other subcutaneous soft tissue.Additionally, many inactivated vaccines contain an adjuvant. Adjuvants are vaccine components that enhance the immune response to an antigen. These components can cause a local reaction to an improperly placed needle, causing pain, redness and swelling.The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention has received reports of people fainting after nearly all vaccines, including the pneumococcal vaccines. Although many episodes of vasovagal syncope occur due to the vaccination process rather than the vaccine itself, there is not yet a definitive answer as to whether an ingredient in the vaccine is responsible for the reaction. Syncope is most commonly seen among adolescents who have certain prior medical conditions and can result in hospitalizations for either evaluation or because of an injury after the episode.

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Signs Of A More Serious Reaction

“A very small percentage of people can have a true allergic reaction to the vaccine, including chest tightness, difficulty breathing, wheezing, facial or throat swelling and redness of the eyes,” Teague says. If you experience these symptoms, you should seek medical attention immediately. Teague says severe allergic reactions usually happen within a few hours of getting the flu shot.

Signs of a severe allergic reaction, according to the CDC, can include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Swelling around the eyes or lips
  • Hives
  • Weakness
  • A fast heartbeat or dizziness

Another possible reaction is an infection where the shot was administered. “Patients can also develop an infection at the injection site, which is manifested as worsening redness, swelling, warmth and tenderness,” Teague says. You should also seek immediate medical attention for this type of reaction.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

What Are The Side Effects

Vaccines are very safe. It is much safer to get the vaccine than to get pneumococcal disease.

Many people have no side effects from the vaccines. For those that do, side effects are usually mild and last 1 to 2 days . Serious side effects are very rare.

It is important to stay in the clinic for 15 minutes after getting any vaccine because there is a very rare possibility, between one in 100,000 and one in a million, of a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis. This may include hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the throat, tongue or lips. Should this reaction occur, your health care provider is prepared to treat it. Emergency treatment includes injection of epinephrine and transfer by ambulance to the nearest emergency department. If symptoms develop after you leave the clinic, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.

It is important to always report serious or unexpected reactions to your immunizing health care provider.

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How To Report A Pneumonia Vaccine Injury

In the wake of suffering damaging side effects such as difficulty breathing, rheumatoid arthritis, an anaphylactic reaction, development of a severe allergy, immune system failure, or a serious infection from the PPSV23 vaccine, PCV13, or the flu vaccine, you should immediately notify your doctor’s office. Be sure to provide the date of vaccination, the vaccine administrators information and the site of injection Your medical provider will ensure that you begin a course of treatment to best address your symptoms. Additionally, you should:

  • Tell your doctor exactly what happened, the date and time of your vaccine, and shoulder it was given
  • Ask your doctor to file a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System form.

VAERS stands for the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, which is a program managed by the CDC. The program processes submitted reports of vaccine injuries and adverse events from those who have been injured. It is important to note that VAERS does not diagnose those who have been injured with a vaccine injury, but rather compile data about reported adverse reactions for the CDC and the Food and Drug Administration in hopes of improving vaccine safety measures in the future. There are no restrictions to who can file a VAERS report and it is often used as supplemental evidence in vaccine cases when determining the onset of an injury or symptoms.

Pneumonia Vaccine Injury Compensation

The Side Effects of Vaccines – How High is the Risk?

If you or a loved one has suffered an adverse reaction, illness, severe or mild side effects, and/or a shoulder injury after receiving the pneumonia vaccine, you may qualify for compensation from a federal program called the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Call the national vaccine injury attorneys at My Vaccine Lawyer for more information. Not only is the phone call free, but our representation comes at no cost to you.

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Whats In The Pneumonia Vaccine

The first thing to know is that there are two types of pneumonia vaccine:

  • Prevenar 13 pneumococcal conjugate vaccine which is given to babies and young children as part of their routine NHS vaccinations. It can also be given to adults who arent in a high-risk group. This type prevents against 13 strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia.
  • Pneumovax 23 pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine which is given to people over 65 and anyone with a health condition that makes them high-risk for pneumonia and its complications. This type prevents against 23 strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia.

Both of these vaccines work in the same way: by encouraging your body to produce antibodies which can fight off pneumococcal bacteria the bacteria that cause pneumonia. Once youve had the vaccine, your body will be better able to fight off infection.

This year to help support the NHS we are just offering the Prevenar 13 vaccination in our stores. This is so the NHS has enough of the Pneumovax 23 to vaccinate those in our communities who are most at risk of catching pneumonia. If you fall into the NHS high-risk category, please contact your GP for advice and to have Pneumovax 23.

Who Shouldn’t Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

If you don’t meet the recommendations for the pneumonia vaccine, you really don’t need to get it, pulmonary critical care expert Reynold Panettieri, MD, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Science at Rutgers University, tells Health. “It’s a risk-benefit ratio,” he explains. “If you’re under 65 and are otherwise healthy, your likelihood of developing pneumococcal pneumonia is unlikely,” he says.

But there are some people who explicitly shouldn’t get the vaccines, per the CDC. Those include:

  • People who have had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PCV13, PPSV23, an early pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7, the DTaP vaccine, or any parts of these vaccines. Talk to your doctor if you’re unsure.
  • People who are currently ill.

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What Are The Symptoms Of Pneumonia

The signs and symptoms of pneumonia can range from mild to severe. The symptoms depend on the type of germ that caused the infection, your age and overall health. Mild signs and symptoms of pneumonia are often similar the symptoms of a cold or flu, but the effects of pneumonia last longer.

Signs and symptoms of pneumonia may include:

  • Chest pain when you breathe or cough
  • Confusion or changes in mental awareness
  • Cough, which may produce phlegm
  • Fatigue
  • Fever, sweating and shaking chills
  • Lower-than-normal body temperature
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
  • Shortness of breath

Newborns and infants may not show any sign or symptoms of the infection. However, they may vomit, have a fever, cough, be restless or tired, or have difficulty breathing and eating.

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